CCS News

CCS Members receive Order of Canada

On December 30, 2016, Rideau Hall announced the latest appointees to the Order of Canada, including long-time members of the CCS, Drs. Ruth Collins-Nakai and Jean-Lucien Rouleau.
 
Dr. Ruth Collins-Nakai is a pediatric cardiologist in Edmonton and served as CCS President from 1999-2002 and was the 2015 CCS Annual Achievement Award recipient.   Dr. Collins-Nakai has been involved with the CCS for over 30 years serving CCS committees, guideline writing panels, as a trainee mentor and as CCS representative to international organizations.   
 
Dr. Jean-Lucien Rouleau is a cardiologist in Montréal, and is a past recipient of both the CCS Research Achievement Award and the CCS Annual Achievement Award.    During his tenure as Scientific Director of the CIHR-Institute of Circulatory and Respiratory Health, he established the annual ICRH-supported research track for trainees at the CCC Trainee Day.

(posted Feb 2, 2017)

We’re excited to announce that CCS will be moving to new offices in downtown Ottawa.

moving card back

Our new address is 222 Queen Street, Suite 1100 Ottawa, Ontario, K1P 5V9

Our email addresses and telephone numbers remain the same. Please note that the move is scheduled for Friday January 27th, email and phone lines may experience outages during the transition. We will close our office Thursday 26th 2017 at 5pm to begin the moving process and will reopen in our new location with a fresh new look on Monday January 30th 2017.

Please take a moment to update our address in your records. For more information visit www.ccs.ca

(posted Jan 15, 2017)

2017 Call for CCS guideline and position statement topics - now open!

The Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) Guidelines Committee is seeking member input to determine guideline and position statement topics for development in 2017-2018.  Guidelines and position statements serve an important role in supporting the mission of the CCS.  Well-developed guidelines have the potential to improve the quality of cardiovascular care, lead to better patient outcomes, improve cost-effectiveness and highlight areas for further research. You must be a CCS member to submit a topic and work on the statement cannot already be initiated.  The call for topics is open until Monday, February 13, 2017.  

Learn more or submit a topic.

(posted Dec 11, 2016)

Welcome 2016-2017 CCS Council Members! 

CCS Council members are elected each year at the CCS Annual Business Meeting during the Canadian Cardiovascular Congress.  Following this year’s election, Dr. Catherine Kells (Halifax) is the CCS President from October 2016 to October 2018.  Dr. Heather Ross (Toronto) is now CCS Past-President and Dr. Andrew Krahn (Vancouver), is the new CCS Vice-President.

To see the complete list of 2016-2017 Council members, please click here. 

(posted Dec 11, 2016)

New! CCS Guidelines TV now available online

Picture1Interested in learning more about our Atrial Fibrillation, Dyslipidemia and Heart Failure guidelines? Check out our new series of short videos featuring CCS key-opinion leaders.  Each video highlights important topics and content from the latest guideline updates. For more information, click here.

(posted Dec 11, 2016)

Healthy living, healthy minds, healthy eating

On October 24, The Honourable Minister of Health, Dr. Jane Philpott spoke to CCC 2016 delegates about the three pillars of Health Canada’s Healthy Canada Strategy: healthy eating, healthy living and healthy minds. The Minister also revealed there will be a 45-day consultation to update Canada’s Food Guide, including making it accessible via apps for smartphone users. To view the Minister’s talk, please click here.

(posted Dec 11, 2016)

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The CCS/CHRS 2016 Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator (ICD) Guidelines are now available online

Sudden cardiac death is a major public health issue in Canada, and despite the overwhelming evidence to support the use of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) in the prevention of cardiac death there remains significant variability in implantation rates across Canada. The Canadian Cardiovascular Society in conjunction with the Canadian Heart Rhythm Society are committed to the promotion of evidence-based practice in Canada, and have reviewed, critically appraised and synthesized new evidence to develop recommendations regarding 1) ICD implantation in the primary and secondary prevention of sudden cardiac death in patients with and without ischemic heart disease 2) When it is reasonable to withhold ICD implantation based on comorbidities 3) ICD implantation in patients listed for heart transplantation 4) Implantation of a single vs. dual chamber ICD 5) Implantation of single vs dual coil ICD leads 6) The role of subcutaneous ICD and 7) ICD implantation infection prevention strategies. This document, in combination with the companion paper addressing the implementation of these guidelines, will assist all medical professionals with the care of patients who have had or at risk of sudden cardiac death.

Read the full guideline. 

(posted Dec 2, 2016)

The Canadian Cardiovascular Society Guidelines on perioperative cardiac risk assessment and management for patients undergoing noncardiac surgery are now available online

Worldwide, one in every 30-40 adults has major noncardiac surgery (i.e., defined here as surgery requiring overnight hospital admission) annually, and >10 million of the >200,000,000 patients having surgery will suffer a major cardiac complication (i.e., cardiac death, myocardial infarction/injury, cardiac arrest) in the first 30 days after surgery. The number of patients undergoing surgery is increasing, as is their age and number of cardiac risk factors. Major perioperative cardiac complications are important because they account for at least a third of perioperative deaths, result in substantial morbidity, prolong hospitalization,increase cost, and impact intermediate and long-term prognosis.

Although prior perioperative cardiac risk guidelines exist, members of the Canadian Cardiovascular Society (CCS) Guidelines Committee and several Canadian opinion leaders believed there was a need for up-to-date cardiac guidelines for patients undergoing noncardiac surgery using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system of evidence assessment for guidelines.

Read the full guideline.

(posted Dec 2, 2016)

The CCS/CHRS 2016 Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillator (ICD) Guidelines are now available online

Sudden cardiac death is a major public health issue in Canada, and despite the overwhelming evidence to support the use of implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) in the prevention of cardiac death there remains significant variability in implantation rates across Canada. The Canadian Cardiovascular Society in conjunction with the Canadian Heart Rhythm Society are committed to the promotion of evidence-based practice in Canada, and have reviewed, critically appraised and synthesized new evidence to develop recommendations regarding 1) ICD implantation in the primary and secondary prevention of sudden cardiac death in patients with and without ischemic heart disease 2) When it is reasonable to withhold ICD implantation based on comorbidities 3) ICD implantation in patients listed for heart transplantation 4) Implantation of a single vs. dual chamber ICD 5) Implantation of single vs dual coil ICD leads 6) The role of subcutaneous ICD and 7) ICD implantation infection prevention strategies. This document, in combination with the companion paper addressing the implementation of these guidelines, will assist all medical professionals with the care of patients who have had or at risk of sudden cardiac death.

Read the full guideline. 

(posted Dec 2, 2016)

Does the 200th anniversary of the stethoscope signal its demise?

On Sunday, October 23rd, at the Canadian Cardiovascular Congress, during the Great Stethoscope Debate chaired by Donald Palisaitis and John Finley, Lyall Higginson and Ken Gin argued that the 200th anniversary of the stethoscope did not signal its demise. While Michael Barrett and Chi-Ming Chow debated it did signal the beginning of the end.

Watch the debate here to determine for yourself!

(posted Dec 2, 2016)